Wednesday, December 17, 2014

Have a child failing in college?

It's that time of year when parents at long last, get to see the report card of their children, after their first semester in college.

And they see a bunch of F marks.

It's no great dishonor to fail college, many, many institutions of higher education have graduation rates of below 10%.

It's no great dishonor to take more than 4 years to get a degree; of the graduates, 6 years is closer to the average time to graduate than 4.

There are many reasons for such abysmal statistics, and primary among them is college administrators have done many things to take students in, and swirl them around until the loan money runs out.

To fail at the end of a semester, a student has fallen for these administrative tricks, not just throughout the semester, but before he even signed up for the course.

My book, What To Do If You Are Failing in College covers all the pitfalls administration has set up, and shows how to avoid the traps that have been set, traps that will prolong your child's stay in college much longer than could possibly do any good.

You can already buy books on how to study, how to take notes, and my book only has a little to add to all the "study and work hard" advice already out there. Instead, I focus on the reality of college...what you should be doing the first week of classes, the first month, by mid-terms, by finals. What you need to have done before you even sign up for your 5th semester of classes. What your 4th year of coursework should look like, regardless of your major.

In short, I cover how to really play the "get a degree" game, in a way that no other book addresses.

Realistically, of course, college isn't for everyone, and for most it's a waste of time and money. If you're dedicated to getting that degree, my book shows how to do so as painlessly as possible. If you want as cheap as possible, there's always University of the People...but it has limited degree programs, is all online, and might not have the prestige you'd like. Still, a four year accredited degree for around $4,000 (total, all 4 years, not just one semester) is something anyone in the "just want to get my degree" category should consider.

If you want a full discussion of the massive fraud that is higher education today, please consider getting Why Johnny Can't Read, Write, or Do 'Rithmetic Even With A College Degree, where I discuss in detail how the current system of higher education is primarily a fraud, on just about every level...there are many good reasons to avoid the system entirely, but if you must do this to yourself or your child, please do what you can to get through it as quickly as possible.

And, happy holidays all.