Tuesday, October 9, 2018

College Madness: A “Fist Bump” Is Sexual Harassment




By Professor Doom

    In our “criminal justice” system, being convicted of a sex crime is a permanent mark of shame. Lay hands on a girl one day shy of her 18th birthday, or equally molest an infant, and forever more you’re branded a “sexual predator,” and your neighbors are notified as such whenever you move. That label is really, really, broad, and as much I respect people should have some warning, the range of crimes it covers is too ridiculous for the warning to serve well.

     On campus, because our Poo-Bahs running the places have a disturbing tendency to cover up such crimes, a large family of laws called “Title IX” was enacted to try to cut down, just a little, the cover-ups of campus sex crimes. There are actually a huge number of rules here beyond governing sexual misconduct, such as how to handle disabilities and how to spend money on various sports teams, among much minutia. Much as “sexual predator” is a bit over-used, “Title IX violator” could well mean a serial rapist on campus…or someone who had a minor discrepancy in accounting between the men’s and women’s track teams.

      It can also be an autistic kid who asked for a “fist bump” in celebration over some minor achievement (a fist bump is a momentary touching of the closed hands of two participants, comparable to a “high 5” and certainly less invasive than a handshake).

     Overall, Title IX is a misguided attempt to force the plunderers running a campus to act with integrity. You really can’t legislate integrity, and so the plunderers used Title IX to the establish huge fiefdoms on campus, filled with grotesquely overpaid bureaucrats whose very job depends on finding ever more violations leading to more Title IX “convictions.” How’s that working out?



     The student, who has autism, cerebral palsy and a shunt to relieve fluid pressure on his brain, was not allowed to defend himself against allegations in two Title IX investigations this past fall, …


     As I’ve mentioned before, campuses have a kangaroo court system, so a target of this system being unable to defend himself is quite common. And, of course, convictions are pretty reliable.

     What’s really funny here is Title IX is supposed to protect the disabled from unfair treatment. Every semester I am given multiple forms asking for various accommodations, which I grant, as per this federal law. So what’s funny?

Though he receives academic accommodations for his disabilities, he was not offered accommodations in the Title IX process,


     So, the law to establish integrity grants the kid the academic accommodations he would already get in a system with integrity…but gives him no quarter when targeted by that law, because the system has no integrity. Good thing we have all those bureaucrats, eh?

The first incident occurred in the first week of September when Marcus was in the Student Services office and asked a female student working there if he could “fist bump” her. She agreed but soon filed a Title IX complaint.


     Now, she “agreed” to momentarily touch knuckles, probably because the kid had just successfully completed one of the little tasks you must complete in the beginning of the school year.

     Before Title IX, the female student worker could complain, but her superior would think “the worker did it willingly, and it was just a fist bump,” and tell the worker that this is just the sort of very minor annoyance you might experience when dealing with a customer. Then the matter would end, and the worker would go back to work.  With Title IX, well now the superior must report this “inappropriate behavior” to the Title IX fiefdom. Past this point, the kid was doomed.

College staff present at the October meeting had Marcus sign an informal resolution of sexual harassment and told him not to have contact with the female student, according to Aurora.


     And now the kid is officially a sexual harasser. For a fist bump.

     Now, the kid has serious issues, and is often accompanied by an assistant.

Marcus was involved with the college’s musical theater program, and wanted to ask a female student in the program if he could take a selfie with her…assistant approved him asking the question, and the female student said yes.

      The assistant probably made a bit of a mistake here, but we do have evidence nothing untoward happened:
It shows Marcus halfway out of the frame, with his arm extended and his hand behind the female student’s head. She’s seated and smiling.


     So…big deal. Sadly, the student decided to complain:

According to a charge letter dated Dec. 1, the student reported the incident as sexual harassment, claiming that Marcus “forcefully placed [his] hand on her shoulder while taking a selfie with her.”


     So, you have witnesses, photographic evidence…surely Title IX would let this one slide, right?

“…they weren’t allowed to present evidence, …”


      I reiterate: these Title IX departments are all about convictions, and I have much inside knowledge of just how kangaroo these court systems are. Having seen these course destroy evidence provided by the defendant (in order to facilitate the conviction), I guess not accepting the evidence in the first place is better than average here.

Marcus was found responsible and suspended,


     Yeah, no kidding. Now, the kid has numerous issues and isn’t doing so well, academically…I respect him trying, however. On the other hand, it’s very clear the college doesn’t want him on campus and he should probably go to another school. Too bad those “sexual harassment” violations will follow him to any other school, and might well preclude him being admitted.

      I feel the need to point out the issue here isn’t merely the Title IX fiefdom simply exploiting this kid as an easy mark, because there is something else one-sided about all this. If the roles were reversed, the male would end up being punished by being forced to attend mandatory sexual harassment training…but at no point will there be any talk of forcing the females here to attend mandatory autism sensitivity training. Hmm.

      But hey, at least all those Title IX investigators will keep getting $100,000 a year for all their fine work, so that’s something.