Monday, February 10, 2014

Really, someone should ask some questions...

 The founder and CEO of American Title Services in Centennial was found dead in his home this week, the result of self-inflicted wounds from a nail gun, according to the Arapahoe County coroner....They said Talley died from seven or eight self-inflicted wounds from a nail gun fired into his torso and head.


--from The Denver Post.


I know, "conspiracy theory" is as much an epithet as much as "diploma mill", but this IS the fourth banker/finance type to die strangely in a week or so. These dots are not so far apart that connecting them is difficult.

Why doesn't the media ask a few questions here? I mean, this guy had money (or at least resources) at his disposal, and he wasn't some guy who spent so much time in the garage that he fell in love with his nail gun and decided that would be the best way to die. He had the means to get better ways to die.

Read that snippet again, or click on the link and read the article. The guy shot himself seven or eight times, in the torso and head. Now, committing suicide with a nail gun is pretty odd, but I can sorta see it in someone who uses a nail gun alot. That doesn't fly here.
How about committing suicide by shooting yourself in the torso with a nail gun? This is over the top bizarre, completely unheard of. Was the guy stupid or something? Again, no, he ran a big finance company...those guys generally aren't stupid.

On the other hand, they have been known to be crooks, and with four dying strangely, why not ask a question like "are we really sure these suicides sound credible?" It really seems like a mainstream newspaper would have the resources for that. This guy, like the others, was under investigation, and maybe he knew it would turn out bad. Lightly linking the story to my blog's theme, note that this guy has some spiffy (questionable) graduate degrees, to add to his resume that he's lied on.

I can't help but wonder if maybe some vigilante group is taking out bankers. I know, that sounds ridiculous, but how much more ridiculous is that theory than "wealthy, educated man decides to kill himself in a slow, unreliable, painful way. We'll present this story as unarguable fact."

You can read about the other three banker deaths here...but you sure won't find mainstream news taking some guesses about the coincidence-factor here.

Am I alone in thinking this is the kind of death that doesn't immediately say "suicide" in light of the other "suicides"?